Success Leaves Clues with Oprah

Success leave clues with Oprah | Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich
In the first chapter of the book, The Right to Be Rich, Wattles talks about the natural tendency for all normal human beings to want to be all that they can be and how being rich plays a pivotal role in the pursuit of a successful and complete life. One particular paragraph caught my attention, he said : 
Every person naturally wants to become all that they are capable of becoming; this desire to realize innate possibilities is inherent in human nature; we cannot help wanting to be all that we can be. Success in life is becoming what you want to be; you can become what you want to be only by making use of things, and you can have the free use of things only as you become rich enough to buy them.
Part of my investigation of the book involves looking for clues in the lives of successful people to see where the principles presented in the book seems to have been applied. As I was listening to an old taping of The Oprah Show that aired on November 14, 2005, I heard Oprah said this :
“There’s always patterns in my life. Whenever I feel like I’ve grown enough in one place I move on. So I felt that I’ve grown enough in National and couldn’t grow anymore so I moved on to Baltimore. I became a co-host of a local morning show called People are Talking with Richard Chair and then one day I heard that there was a morning show in Chicago that needed a new host, so I stayed up all night long with an editor, sent my audition tape in. Because I was one of those people who wasn’t prepared, I didn’t have... I wasn’t keeping all my stories, so I had to work all night. I was obsessed with getting this job. [...] I got hired.” - Oprah.
And it doesn't stop there. Now she has her own television channel, OWN, where she continues to provided value to her audience.


Every person naturally wants to become all that they are capable of becoming; this desire to realize innate possibilities is inherent in human nature; we cannot help wanting to be all that we can be. 

I think Oprah is a great example of someone showcasing what Wattles talks about in the quote above. It seems like she naturally constantly wants to become more and to do more. Perhaps one of the main difference between her and someone else who's not as successful is the fact the she doesn't hold on to things that no longer serve her. Once she felt that she had grown as much as possible in one place, she moved on to the next opportunity: She took the next step up.  She didn't content herself with her co-host job, she went on to have her own talk show and once that was done after a successful 25 years, she created her own television channel where she can continue to grow and bring her fans along with her.


Success in life is becoming what you want to be; you can become what you want to be only by making use of things, and you can have the free use of things only as you become rich enough to buy them.

Without a large amount of money, Oprah would not have been able to create her own channel with her own unique shows and she most likely would not have been able to grow as much as she has thus far. As a consequence, she would not have been able to inspire and help countless number of people around the world, through her presence on TV, her endorsements, her gifts, her insights and her philanthropy. I believe this is why Wattles says that it is sinful to be content with less and not strive for more because by doing so you're not only doing yourself a disservice but you're also doing others an even greater disservice. Imagine if you have the capacity to be as influential as Oprah in your own unique field. What a shame it would be to not let others benefit from your equivalent contribution to the world.  

I have a feeling I'll find a lot of what Wattles proposed to do in the life story of many successful people. As I move through the book I'll make sure to include more posts on case studies showing how the principles of the book have help others achieve success.



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What is Money?

What is Money ? | Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich
What is money? A couple years ago, I started thinking about this question and eventually came to the conclusion that money is energy, physically manifested in various forms. What!? Let me explain. 

Most of the time, the first image that comes to mind when one thinks of money will be a little piece of paper, often with the portrait of an important historical figure on it, a bunch of markings and a number representing the value attributed to that piece of paper. But when you really think about it, it’s just a fancy printed paper with a number on it. So much so that you can’t even scan, print or photocopy money even if it's just for fun. Most photocopiers, scanners, printers and softwares have special embedded codes that recognizes money and prevents you from scanning, printing, or photoshoping it on your own, even just a portion of it. 

But that’s not the only physical form in which money exists. It can also be a piece of paper signed by you in the form of a cheque. By signing a cheque, you determine and assign value to that piece of paper. The same piece of paper can be worth $5, $500, $5000, $50,000 or more. As long as you have a bank account, hopefully with money in it, you have the power to give value to that piece of paper. In a sense, you have the power to create money.  

Furthermore, with the current advances in technology, money is also computer codes represented by numbers on a screen that you can now access via a bank machine, your own electronic devices or through the use of a plastic card commonly named credit card or debit card. And with the evolution of systems like paypal, bitcoin or dogecoin, it’s even harder to really define what money is, other than a number based on a mutually agreed value.

So with that in mind, money is really just the representation of exchanges between people. Sometime the exchange is material, like trading money for a pair of shoes. Other times the exchange is immaterial, like trading money for piece of mind through insurance policies. But there’s always an exchange in value or what I like to refer to as energy. 



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Sneak Peek : Table of contents

Sneak Peek | Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich  
There are a lot of information and insights to take away from the book The Science of Getting Rich, despite the fact that it is relatively small. Since it was meant to be an instruction manual, my first thought was to analyze the way the information was originally presented. As such, one of the first things I did, after reading and listening to the book several times, was to analyze the table of contents. I guess it's my way to somehow reverse engineer Wattles' thinking process in writing his book so that I can better understand his instructions.

Although the original book is divided in 18 sections, I find they can further be grouped into the following five sections:

Section 1 : Preface
The preface simply states what the reader can expected from reading the book and following the provided instructions.

Section 2 : Paradigm Shift (Chapters 1 to 3)
For a lot of people, their belief system when it comes to earning money is the main force keeping them from achieving their goals. In the first three chapters, Wattles exposes these belief systems as a way to provide the readers with a new perspective and give them the opportunity to dispose of the ones that are detrimental in their pursuit.

Section 3 : Basic Principles (Chapters 4 to 7) 
Before giving away the instructions on how to get rich, Wattles provides a couple key principles that are the foundation of the science of getting rich. Chapters 4 to 7 describes each of these principles. After essentially giving the reader a new pair of glasses in the previous section, the next step is to recalibrate their belief systems in this section, in order for them to be able to correctly apply the provided instructions.

Section 4 : Applying the Principles (Chapters 8 to 13) 
Once the readers's belief system has been successfully re-calibrated, Chapters 8 to 13 guides them through the instructions enabling them to achieve their financial goals.

Section 5 : Updated Belief System (Chapters 14 to 17)
The last four chapters provide important points to keep in mind while performing the necessary tasks to become rich, as well as a summary of the main principles of the Science of Getting Rich.


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Rich Artist Poor Artist

Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich | Rich Artist Poor Artist
Rich Artist Poor Artist | Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich
I once believed in the idea of the starving artist: The idea that pursuing a career in the arts was essentially pursuing a career in poverty. Coming from a lower-middle class family of immigrants, there was no way this was going to happen despite my early interest in arts. It was better for me to keep my creative activities as hobbies and pursue a traditional professional career. So, as a result, I became an engineer (luckily I have interests in science so the process was not too painful). But art never really left my side, in fact despite casting it aside, it kept calling me and luring me closer throughout the years until one day, last year,  I decided to just jump in and see what would happen. 

I did it somewhat cautiously. I needed to know that there were living artists today who were doing very well financially. So I looked for proof: I did a quick search online to find living artists making a good living and what I found exceeded my expectations by a very long shot. Not only there are making a good living, many of them are multimillionaires. The individual net worth of the current top 10 artists range from  $40 Million to $1 Billion :


My thought, after finding out about these artists was that if they can make millions, there's no reason why I can't make a good living as an artist. After finding the answer to my first question : "Is it possible?", my next question was to find out "How do artists become rich?"

During my search for the answer to this question, I found an old book claiming to have the answer : The Science of Getting Rich by Wallace D. Wattles. Published in 1910, it is said to have influence several successful people over the years including Napoleon Hill (author of Think and Grow Rich), Rhonda Byrnes (author of The Secret), Tom Buthler-Bowdon (author of the 50 Classics series) and many more. 

Wallace's book, states the following in the preface : 

THIS book is pragmatical, not philosophical; a practical manual, not a treatise upon theories. It is intended for the men and women whose most pressing need is for money; who wish to get rich first, and philosophize afterward. It is for those who have, so far, found neither the time, the means, nor the opportunity to go deeply into the study of metaphysics, but who want results and who are willing to take the conclusions of science as a basis for action, without going into all the processes by which those conclusions were reached.
- Wallace D. Wattles.
My understanding is that his book is essentially a rags to riches instruction manual. But, perhaps because it was written over 100 years ago, it's difficult to fully understand and a little out of date. I find myself re-reading the book a couple times, taking notes and looking for examples and clues of Wattles' principles in the lives of people who have already achieved success. 

As my notes are getting more extensive and I'm finding out more fascinating and concrete examples in the lives of known successful people, I figured it would be nice to also put these findings together in a study guide for others to benefit from, which is what I'm currently working on : Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich. This is also how this blog came to be. I will be documenting some of my thoughts and findings as I go along and share the process of putting everything together with you.  


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New Book : Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich


Ever since I decided to follow my dreams and pursue a career in the arts, I’ve also been feverishly looking for ways to make a great living while doing it. I don't subscribe to the "Starving artist” lifestyle and have been looking for ways to overcome it. There are plenty of living artists who make a comfortable living while remaining creative, so I decided to look for clues. While looking for clues, I discovered an old book called the Science of Getting Rich, by Wallace D Wattles. This book, published in 1910, claimed that earning money is nothing more than a scientific process that requires us to follow certain procedures in order to acquire as much as we want and are capable of using for the betterment of ourself and others.

Since the book is a over 100 years old it's a little difficult to understand. I've been going over it a couple times, taking notes and adding my own findings and thoughts about the claims in order to see how they apply today. Along with my study of this book, I started to look for clues by analyzing the lives of those who have gone from rags to riches, as a way to better understand the principles and find concrete proof that they work. I figured if I can find a good number of people who have, knowing or unknowingly, followed the proposed process and were successful at it, I can do the same. And, following the principle of increase proposed in the book, I am sharing my findings so that it can benefit others as well. 

As my notes are getting more extensive and I'm finding out more fascinating and concrete examples in the lives of known successful people, I figured it would be nice to also put these findings together in a study guide for others to benefit from, which is what I'm currently working on : Making Sense of the Science of Getting Rich. This is also how this blog came to be. I will be documenting some of my thoughts and findings as I go along, and share the process of putting everything together with you.  

If you’re interested in being one of the first to know when the books will be available for purchase, subscribe to MJ's Newsletter below. As a token of appreciation, you will receive a free and updated PDF copy of The Science of Getting Rich from which the upcoming Study Guide, Workbook and Case Studies will be based on.

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